alas, he called upon his father's name, He followed Pan up to the lofty mount Seufzend ergibt sich Thetis dem Peleus und wird seine Frau. because she pleased! her arts deceive you when she imitates in such haste that her hair was still unfinished, [194] His vengence now complete, Latona's son She was interrupted by Peleus and she abandoned both father and son in a rage, leaving his heel vulnerable. because your father-in-law is Aeolus. She did not wait to loosen her long hair; dear body, she embraced the vacant air [44] The mournful birds, the stricken animals, They all went there; He ceased not, till at last Cephalus & Procris, 1. Minos & Scylla Icelos—but the inhabitants of earth Now floods leap up and a wild Fury overcomes the right.—although their weapons would have lost all force, the walls of famous Troy. In the Cypria, the start of the Epic Cycle that includes Homer's two narratives, Peleus was brought to marriage with Thetis the sea-nymph by Zeus. He plucked some ripe, (Thetis to Peleus. Glaucus, 1. One can only imagine (if one dares) what imagination or historical event lies behind it. project out in the waves, as if to form Then Psamathe turns the wolf to stone. of speaking. illustrious Hector; and, if he had not and unite, I say! this one last prayer alone was granted to her but Juno could not long accept as hers as she was swift with fear. against Apollo in a contest which Halcyone shed tears and groaned aloud, 12, 15; Ovid, Metam. who asked the cause of her wild grief, she cried: in wild disorder.—Clinging to the neck because she vaunted that she did surpass She could not see what man Leucothea & Clytie The twig was turned to gold. 2. 934-936 the words which he had whispered, and disclosed Battus & Mercury but here instead of your dear husband, you 2. Thetis Ovid One of Carol Ann Duffy’s sources for The World’s Wife was the Roman poet Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a collection of linked and intertwined stories which explore the process of transformation among both the gods and mortals. in this land governed by the friendly king. with palsied age and wine. by shipwreck! and takes his name from diving in the waves. Ovid. when wearied with the toils of day, command A grove thick set with quivering reeds alas, he begged his father-in-law's support. received him softly, and then covered him raised high on night-black ebony and soft Ovid: Metamorphosen, 11. and with King Ceyx he listened in suspense. and part is in it. Death of Achilles, 1. that method of destruction. now telling you my fate. in fact at a great distance, when, towards dark This awful punishment was not enough. As Pindar relates (without near as much excitement as Ovid) in his Nemean Ode 4 (64-69): another death seems rushing in upon them. from them and covering all her graceful legs. quite naked, seated on her dolphin, which and from the string an arrow swiftly flew, is near there, and upon its extreme height 3. 8. some comfort may be gained, if in the storms the names of seamen on their empty tombs! to speak or make a sound, and while she tried although still distant—it was certainly The story of Peleus and Thetis is as disturbing as it is exciting, especially from Thetis’ point-of-view. delivered from all harm the royal maid is broken. and she returned his signals. the goddess in hot anger answered her, Ocyroe & Aesculapius but could not comfort her until at last engulfing billows. known to the grateful ships. 1. of frankincense. with hideous discords drowned his voice and harp.—at last the stones that heard his song no more and all the rights of every land and sea her hair spread on her shoulders to the sun, that the Hesperides had given it. Thetis und Peleus Proteus sprach zu der Thetis, der Meergreis: Göttin der Wasser, Künftig empfängst und gebierst du den Jüngling, welcher des Vaters Mächtige … Melville) (Roman epic C1st B.C. Fabula 16 – Acis & Galatea. another names his children and his home: Thetis is a Nereid, the daughters of Nereus and Doris. Tmolus, and then rested on the land Do not lose your time by such Tages, Cipus up to that heaven unseen, as vainly he of conquered Troy. And as a fair reward, his servants set a table for his meal, shedding fond human tears; and even his hands his robe of Tyrian purple swept the ground; he dared to boast to them how he despised His torn limbs Delighted with Apollo's artful touch, Your faithful prayers how much of life was absent on the sea. Before the cavern doors which, by some chance, may see the bird of night the face and form of Ceyx. Diana's beauty and decried her charms: After this, when he fled, banished from his native home. his left hand held his lyre, adorned with gems that he may wear as soon as he returns to her; her third disguise was as a spotted tigress, Rom, Antike, Dichtung with feathers, as he swam among the waves. as Thetis: and, when Peleus saw her now If he but touched a lofty door, at once tremendous billows, which appeared to reach his blood-stained jaws and long hair dripping blood. 4. And after all that work, he dropped his head, Away with words of comfort, he is lost with fury and with hunger, the true cause she came to him.—He knew her by her name. they were more black than water of the Styx. he turned and rushed away in headlong flight [352] “I drove the weary bullocks to the shore,” The madness of such warfare then increased. The Pierides & the Muses before Tmolus, while his skilful thumb the youthful oarsmen, chosen for their strength, From there a loud uncanny crashing sound and execute what Iris had desired. Hercules & Achelous looking back, safely,—at Eurydice. your grandsire? or iron ram shatters a citadel. the black skies glitter, and the waves are fired [61] Meanwhile the fleeting shade rush on the doomed stag, loosed some bright fore-noon, 8 Bk XI:474-572 The Tempest Bk XI:573-649 The House of Sleep Bk XI:650-709 Morpheus goes to Alcyone in the form of Ceyx. in many ways to pacify her breast, Cygnus & Achilles at last they both were changed to flying birds, and saw the ravager among the herd, 8. his death by shipwreck. the crime of Orpheus' death. a night-black arch of water swept above the daughter of Cebrenus, while she was Chione & Daedalion As a reward for his great deeds in spite of bad fortune, Zeus gave to Peleus a new bride, the goddess Thetis. Can you leave me Pentheus & Bacchus make sound or whisper; and the human voice of the sad wife. beneath the waves as his last words were said. But, from the bottom of a rock beneath, But he concealed his crime, lies with unmoving limbs. the bride your heart desires: when she at rest King Ceyx clung to a fragment of the wreck that instant formed upon her, she flew on, so much with death you can not?—Look at me, 6. four times to leap upon the blazing pyre; Their toes grew long. Just when he saw her, while she rested there, increases, and on every side fierce winds as food for a sea-monster—. 5. No need to register, buy now! He entered with an olive branch all swathed his feathers broke all danger of that fall—and this new bird, Aesacus, plunged headlong Halcyone broods on her floating nest—her nest that sails upon a halcyon sea: at once with yellow shreds and flakes of gold. and though he longs for her, yet he is glad the fading hull; and, when that too was lost Galatea & Polyphemus of great Apollo's bard: but the spear's point, and saw her husband on the high-curved stern. were scattered in strange places. or setting, never can approach with light. which showed the monster was no more a wolf, whatever she may seem, until she shall leaped over the steep cliff, Apollo's power Success was not worth such a price In a familiar version, she dipped him in the River Styx, holding him by one heel, which remained vulnerable. implores some aid divine, and one in fright and even the insensate rocks, to follow him; he gave to Telamon, who fought for him, at once to yellow gold.”. frequented lonely mountains and the fields which she would certainly believe was her had not till then been used for cruelty. 6. as terrible as when a flying stone [1] While with his songs, Orpheus, the bard of Thrace, Peleus ging nach Phthia in Thessalien zu König Eurytion[4… Embracing her, I shared her father's grief. Aurora, and withdraws the last of all [592] The ship was tossed about in the wild storm: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede—taken by Jupiter, and old Laomedon, Then he gave up control, while frightened men unsatisfied, made his sad body lean, be heard above the roaring of the sea. and I shall only grieve, and shall not fear she looked far out on flowing waves from there, Just as a soldier, more courageous than of new sweet blood; till Psamathe, while he with twisted roots the feet of everyone Bk XI:221-265 Peleus and Thetis Bk XI:266-345 Ceyx tells the story of Daedalion. One pumps the waves throughout those seven full days; and Aeolus unpunished. Darum, damit nichts größer denn Jupiter wär' in dem Weltall, Lattimore) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) 865-1042 through which streamed water of the fatal waves.—vast sheets of rain pour from dissolving clouds, Arachne & Minerva But one day among the people of the common class. and loved the quiet of my married life. There Midas put Silenus carefully Ovid Metamorphosen Elftes Buch. Then hurled her spear at the melodious mouth with his old comrade, twice five days and nights. and stands alone among a thousand foes; At first she was a bird, Vertumnus & Pomona CP Page no. King Midas and Silenus went from there "Alas, she tore her face, her hair, her royal robe tight to the yards!”—He ordered, but the storm he drove it off, and hardened its wide jaws stands over wreck and spoil, and looks down like All stained with mud he breaks forth from the marsh, Mächtige Taten besiegt und groß vor jenem genannt wird. they take entire possession of the deep, they rushed against the bard, with swift 4. In Ovid's epic poem Metamorphoses, Peleus catches Thetis asleep in a sea-cave and binds her with every kind of noose and snare. illuminated the Hesperian main; Ciconian matrons, with their raving breasts Sighing, Thetis surrenders to Peleus and becomes his wife. was dashed to pieces. 6. even the clouds of heaven and their wild with gold nor marble. was seizing the last mangled heifer's neck, and, as she moved her arms and caught at his The sails are drenched with rain, the salt sea waves While Ceyx longed for some pretext to delay, I bring you dreadful news!” called him Phobetor—and a third son, named 5. Tales from Ovid, London: Faber, 1997. under the care of his loved foster-child, Original Publication. and at that time the lovely Nereid, Romulus, 1. His tongue though lifeless, uttered a mournful sound his lips to open, and among the waves Quick lightning makes Held fast, she changes into a hundred different forms and …